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NHFMA presents springtime work

Chest by Garrett Hack and

Chest by Garrett Hack and

The New Hampshire Furniture Masters Association, a group of professional makers, recently presented some of their members’ latest work in the “Spring is in the Air” exhibition, which ran from March 19 to June 18 at the Smile Building in Concord, N.H., located within the Concord Chamber of Commerce’s Welcome Center.

Organized to show fresh work with the timing of a new season, featured pieces included wooden heirloom art and furniture made by the Masters in 2020. Participating Masters include Owain Harris, Roger Myers, Tim Coleman, Garrett Hack, Richard Oedel, Liz Grace, Jeffrey Cooper, Jon Brooks, Leah Woods and John Geraghty.

Tim Coleman’s “Ruby Bench” in the NHFMA exhibit.

Tim Coleman’s “Ruby Bench” in the NHFMA exhibit.

The exhibition is featured online at the NHFM website, www.furnituremasters.org, and includes a “Look Book” digital catalog that includes materials/dimensions for each piece and information about the maker.

Wall cabinets by NHFMA member Leah Woods

Wall cabinets by NHFMA member Leah Woods

Wood in contemporary art

Sperone Westwater, a New York gallery, is currently hosting “Wood Works: Raw, Cut, Carved, Covered”, a diverse exhibition showcasing innovative uses of wood in contemporary art. The show opened June 4 and will run through Aug. 27.

Richard Long’s “Quantock Wood Circle” from the Sperone Westwater exhibit

Richard Long’s “Quantock Wood Circle” from the Sperone Westwater exhibit

Featured work includes pieces by artists Carla Accardi, Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Kim Dingle, Michele Oka Doner, Rico Gatson, Helmut Lang, Richard Long, Emil Lukas, David Lynch, Katy Moran, Paulo Nazareth, Noah Purifoy, Brent Owens, Tom Sachs, Andrew Sendor, Jean Tinguely, Richard Tuttle and William Wegman.

Bench by NHFMA member Jeffrey Cooper.

Bench by NHFMA member Jeffrey Cooper.

“Among the classic artists in the show, Richard Long utilizes 285 irregular pieces of wood, gathered from the Quantock Hills in Somerset, England, near his hometown in Bristol, to create Quantock Wood Circle (1981). Carl Andre, by contrast, uses identical elements which stand and hold together by their own mass. In Nixes Mate (1992), Andre utilizes eight Western red cedar timbers, measuring 12” x 12” x 36”, the standard size for his sculptures of uncarved blocks. Carla Accardi’s Verde (1974) utilizes wooden stretcher bars which remain visible under sicofoil, a pliable and transparent industrial plastic, rather than canvas,” according to a gallery statement.

For more, visit www.speronewestwater.com

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