Game on

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Scenes from the 2017 Fresh Wood competition, including Cody Campanie’s Best of Show table (top, right) and Sarah Provard’s “Musically Inclined” case piece, winner of the People’s Choice award.

Scenes from the 2017 Fresh Wood competition, including Cody Campanie’s Best of Show table (top, right) and Sarah Provard’s “Musically Inclined” case piece, winner of the People’s Choice award.

This year’s Fresh Wood student furniture competition at the 2019 AWFS Fair in Las Vegas will feature a special “Sports and Games” category.

Projects in this category must be at least 50 percent wood or wood composite and need to relate to either a sport or a game. Students can enter a tennis racket, hockey stick, fishing equipment, hunting equipment, canoe, dart board, card table, pool table, ping pong table, chess set, or other related item.

“We are really excited to see the entries for this category. We’ve had several ping pong tables and game tables entered into previous Fresh Wood contests and they always attract a crowd,” says AWFS education director Adria Salvatore.

The competition is open to high school and post-secondary students in accredited woodworking or related programs.

Other categories include Case Goods, Seating, Tables, Design for Production, and Open, which allows projects made of any material.

Entries will be rated by a panel of judges representing different aspects of the industry. Their scores will determine the finalists, whose work will be on display near the fair’s “Turning to the Future” exhibit, another student competition conducted by the American Association of Woodturners.

Entry applications for Fresh Wood are due by May 1.

For complete contest information, visit www.awfsfair.org.

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