An open house  spreads the message - Woodshop News

An open house  spreads the message

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Holding an open house is great way to educate prospective customers about your shop’s processes and capabilities. Following a presentation, visitors to the OakBridge Timber Framing event had lunch with employees, toured the shop, and observed timber-framing demonstrations.

Holding an open house is great way to educate prospective customers about your shop’s processes and capabilities. Following a presentation, visitors to the OakBridge Timber Framing event had lunch with employees, toured the shop, and observed timber-framing demonstrations.

OakBridge Timber Framing of Loudonville, Ohio, prides itself on crafting homes like finely built furniture, using traditional mortise-and-tenon joinery, only on a much larger scale.

Oakbridge-Shop-Tour-screen-projection

A family-run Amish business formed in 1986, the company hosted one of its bi-annual open house events in November, giving attendees a chance to meet their craftsmen, learn about timber framing and how the company works.

OakBridge has built homes in 25 states, built with hand and pneumatic tools using techniques handed down from generation to generation. Owner Johnny Miller works alongside his father, children, brothers and cousins, all of whom grew up raising frames.

Attendees-discussing-business

“We treat each home we build as if it were going to be our own,” says Miller. “To us, timber framing is an art. It’s not about how quickly we get it done. It’s about how well we get it done.

“To know that the structures we build with our own hands are the places that people call home, where they raise their families and visit with loved ones, it’s one of the best feelings. To be able to do this for thirty years and going is an immense privilege.”

And that’s basically the message relayed at the open-house events. Miller says they’ve been a great success and something other shops should consider.

For more company information, visit www.oakbridgetimberframing.com

This article originally appeared in the January 2018 issue.

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