Python XPR CNC lightens the load on the operator

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Offering robotic capabilities for loading and unloading material, the new Python XPR CNC machine from CNC Factory increases production by reducing operator time and fatigue, according to the company.

The Python XPR with loading and unloading tables; and the manual setup.

The Python features a hydraulically assisted loading table that can accommodate up to 40 sheets of 3/4” stock, and a laser-guided unloading table.

“This is a huge production booster,” CNC Factory president Chris Corrales says. “There is less fatigue for the user, less back pain and injuries. If you need to use 30 or so pieces of material for a kitchen job, you just put the load right on the loading table with a forklift. At that point, the machine will do all the lifting for them. It will pick up that material, it will load it in for them much faster than if two people will manually load it and it will automatically cut it. When it’s done, it will automatically unload the parts and it will clean and sweep the spoilboard at the same time it’s loading in another piece.

“The Python can perform as a stand-alone machine that can be operated in the traditional manner with manual loading and unloading. It can accept single piecework coordinates and the loading and unloading tables can be removed and stored elsewhere while not in use.”

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The Python features a 12-hp HSD spindle; 12-tool Rapid Rotary tool changer; 2,000”/min of rapid travel; Delta direct helical rack-and-pinion servos; dual layer high-flow vacuum table; automatic positioning pins, and automatic dust collection channeling. It also includes posts for Cabinet Vision, KCD, Mozaik, 2020 and Autodesk software, and is compatible with any CAD/CAM program via G-Code. It can be customized to include drill banks and appropriate table sizes, according to the company.

The Python XPR with a 4’ x 8’ bed sells for about $69,900.

For more, visit www.cncfactory.com.

This article originally appeared in the December 2016 issue.

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