Over and over

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In our business, we are often called upon to work outside of our comfort zone. Sometimes it’s in the form of needing to create a unique design that does not fit within the parameters of our typical production format. These projects may require us to master a new technique or a tool we have never used before.

These challenges are rarely simple or easy. I have spent many hours designing a project, redrawing it over and over, getting ideas along the way, realizing that some simply will not work. The Wright brothers were known to say that you have to get it right on paper first.

But even if you get it right on paper, that is no guarantee that it will work in reality or, even if it does work, that it will look right. So, we have to be light on our feet, open to making modifications along the way. And even then, we might find that the best way becomes apparent only after the project is completed, presenting us with the possibility of simply dumping the whole thing and starting over. Edison tried many things before making a working light bulb. WD40 is so called because it was the result of 40 attempts to get the formula right. It has been said that perseverance is the most important thing.

I’ve never had to make something 40 times over, but I have done two or three.

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