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Defining art and craft

I recently came across the following definitions that attempt to differentiate art and craft.

Art: An unstructured and boundless form of work that expresses emotions, feelings and vision.

Craft: An activity that involves creation of tangible objects with the use of the hands and brain.

So, can we assume that we do not need our hands or brain to create art? What an absurd idea! I only repeat this because I am always amused by the apparent need to separate art and craft. Most of us who are makers rarely worry about categorizing that which we make. We tend to understand that making is in itself an art and that craft simply suggests some degree of competence.

Who can say what good art is? Good craft, on the other hand, is easy to spot because the level of competence of the maker is there for all to see. But something can be poorly made and still be artistic. The thing that puzzles me is why so many people feel the need to make this distinction.

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