It worked

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Planning shop layout doesn’t always work. But when it does, it’s awesome.

Before permanently placing my table saw, I spent a couple months considering a dozen or more locations. The issue wasn’t space – I had nearly 2,000 sq. ft. to work with – but rather the several steel columns supporting the ceiling joists. I had enclosed most of the columns inside wall framing, but there was one left smack dab in the middle of my workspace. I also framed around that column, but it was still in the middle of things.

It seemed that no matter where or how I oriented the saw, large stock could encounter either that framed column, or a wall. I finally decided that the best spot was actually right up close to that column, but with allowances to accommodate most stock.

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With this arrangement, I had 35" to the left of the blade that cleared the column, which was fine for most of what I typically cut, plus that clearance allowed me to rip a 4x8 sheet of plywood right down the middle with no issue. A year ago, I added a dust collection duct offset 5" from the column, giving me 30" clearance there. But that’s so far ahead of the blade as to be a non-issue for crosscuts – and I can still rip a 4x8 sheet of plywood in half.

As to long 2-by stock, I had a full 8' clearance to both sides of the blade, and with the machine set back such that the blade was 19" from where the column began to the left, that accommodates all long stock up to that width with ease.

Try as you might to gaze into the future when setting up machines, it’s easy to overlook something, meaning you have to start moving things around. But by taking a lot of time to get this machine placed correctly, I’m pleased to say that after a bit more than two years I haven’t had a single issue cutting anything on that saw. It’s in that spot to stay.

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