An interesting development

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Woodworkers know only too well how addictive it is to lust after new tools. I think my wife is finally beginning to understand.

Sally’s interest in stained glass work began about 20 years ago, but with job changes and such she drifted away from it. But by building her a dedicated space for working glass right as she entered semi-retirement, she has excitedly been drawn back into it big time. The first sign of her new addiction was spending hours looking at glass catalogs and websites. Then it was ordering tools and supplies, and then more tools and supplies. And then…

Her glass grinder had been in storage for more than a decade, which wasn’t kind to it. Some parts have apparently rusted solid (these machines use water as a lubricant), and it just doesn’t work as well as it used to. Worse, some parts are so frozen up that after working with the grinder at length I can’t get them apart for replacement.

So, now she’s machine shopping with all the glee of a seasoned woodworker drooling over a new table saw. You know that feeling as well as I do. You also know that as someone who’s experienced tool lust for decades, I should be warning her about it and doing my best to steer her clear of it before it becomes incurable.

Or, I could gleefully encourage it. I’ll let you guess which path I’m taking.

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