Woodworking Stories, Woodworker Profiles and Products

Vertical advantage

Monday, 15 November 2010 00:00

45_verticaladvantage_01For shops that cut a lot of sheet goods, a panel saw is a necessity. The vertical panel saw has become a popular choice since it takes up minimal floor space and has ergonomic loading advantages.

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A life-changing calculation

Written by Jennifer Hicks Monday, 15 November 2010 00:00

35_calculation_01Southern California native W. Patrick Edwards chose woodworking over a career as a nuclear physicist. He was building rocket guidance systems one day and felt he was forced to make a decision. His passion for antiques, marquetry and working with hand tools won out.

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A blast from the past

Written by Jennifer Hicks Monday, 18 October 2010 00:00

35_beech_coverBeech River Mill is anything but your run-of-the-mill woodworking shop. This family-run business produces custom louvered and paneled products such as doors, shutters and blinds for clients throughout the country. The unique 2,500-sq.-ft. shop is part of a quaint historic mill building in Center Ossipee, N.H., a truly quintessential New England town.

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Seeing is believing

Monday, 18 October 2010 00:00

39_laguna_toolMost of the large CNC manufacturers were absent from IWF 2010 in Atlanta. Companies such as Stiles, Biesse America and Delmac decided not to exhibit at IWF and instead hosted a NexGen event, a tour of their North Carolina facilities earlier this year. A second NexGen event is scheduled for early October.

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Shepherd’s timeless journey

Monday, 18 October 2010 00:00

45_chap-a1Many who read this shop profile started their business with little money and meager surroundings - often in a garage. But few, if any, can claim they started their woodworking business in a chicken coop. Hap Shepherd and his late partner Tony Maurer began working in a chicken coop in 1974 before moving into a Civil War-era factory. The business, Maurer & Shepherd Joyners Inc. of Glastonbury, Conn., focuses on 17th-, 18th- and 19th-century millwork, primarily reproducing doors, windows, moldings and wide-pine flooring.

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