Woodworking Techniques and Advice

Some simple rules will smooth things

Friday, 18 July 2008 13:09

Experienced shop managers know that productivity is harmed not by catastrophe, but often by common errors. For example, a worker who bears down on a sander is not only working himself too hard, he may very well be damaging the equipment. Fortunately, breakdowns and inferior results can be avoided — and profits can be increased — if everyone in the shop heeds the five rules for saving men and machines.



The versatility of veneer

john_englishWhether repairing antiques, building one-of-a-kind furniture or laminating curves on cabinets, most woodworkers eventually discover veneer. One’s first instinct is to think of it as simply a way to get the most out of rare cuts or species. But veneer serves many functions beyond thrift. It makes life easier when dealing with curves, gives a woodworker access to some very dramatic grains and colors and can be applied to a stable substrate to create wide panels or complex patterns.



Sanding head variations have their roles

howard-grivnaThere are four basic types of sanding heads and one major hybrid variation that can be applicable to any sanding head type that incorporates a polishing platen.



Saw upkeep should be high on your list

Wednesday, 27 August 2008 15:28

Consistent care and maintenance is necessary to ensure your tool's peak performance for many years to come



Tolerance threshold vital for wide belt sanders

howard-grivnaThere are several factors that affect a wide belt sander’s ability to hold a close thickness tolerance. When a sander is new, with proper operating procedures, any rigid orifice-type machine should reasonably hold plus or minus .005” tolerance. If a machine has been specifically designed and has the right characteristics to hold a close tolerance, thickness tolerances of plus or minus .0025” are achievable. However, within a short period of time (less than one year), certain wear factors require machine maintenance procedures along with proper operating procedures in order to continue to obtain tight thickness tolerances.



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